Warren Goes Big, Rise of Boris and Oligarch Purge: Weekend Reads

(Bloomberg) — Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren is trying to beat Donald Trump at his own game by going big on policy. New U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is also taking a bold approach after storming to power with a pledge to get a better Brexit deal or leave the European Union without one.In Saudi Arabia, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is trying to build a futuristic supercity, while in Hong Kong, inequality is kindling fear that goes beyond the street protests shaking the Asian megalopolis.We hope you enjoy these and other longer stories from the past seven days – including one about Ukraine’s oligarch purge and another on the rising violence in Cape Town – in this edition of Weekend Reads.Elizabeth Warren Has Radical Plan to Beat Trump at His Own GameShe’s staking her campaign on bold policy promises. Read Joshua Green’s profile of her push for a platform that includes a wealth tax, wiping out student debt and giving Medicare to everyone in a giant leap in Democratic ambition.Will Ireland Buckle in the Face of Johnson? Don’t Count on ItAs Johnson cements power in London, the mood in Dublin remains resolute. Dara Doyle reports how Ireland isn’t budging after the U.K.’s new leader demanded scrapping of the backstop, the proposed arrangement for keeping the Irish border open after Brexit.Build It and They Will Come? Saudi Prince’s Megacity Takes ShapeIn the sleepy fishing village of Khurayba, Prince Mohammed wants investors to help him realize a $500 billion vision. Vivian Nereim and Donna Abu-Nasr write about the plans for a futuristic city with state-of-the-art resorts and smart technologies run by robots.Mexico’s President Keeps Score by the Peso as Economy NosedivesPresident Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador tends to ask advisers for an update on how the peso is doing. Nacha Cattan explains that, while it’s doing pretty well, it’s about the only good news. Also, read Eric Martin’s account of how plans to transform the country have run into a tough reality.The NoMarriage Movement Is Adding to Korea’s Economic Woesn accountant during the week, Baeck Ha-na spends her weekends promoting the “live-alone life” as a YouTube star in South Korea. Jihye Lee reports how a growing number of women are rejecting marriage and motherhood, intensifying economic challenges for a country with one of the world’s lowest birth rates.Hong Kong’s Despair Runs Deeper Than Violent Street ProtestsCandy Kwok worries about about her daughter’s future more than a government crackdown against her and other protesters in Hong Kong’s streets. Shawna Kwan and Natalie Lung tell how crippling inequality is complicating efforts by the city’s government to quell the worst political crisis since 1997.Rising Cape Town Gang Violence Is Another Legacy of ApartheidJust 12 miles from Cape Town’s beaches and five-star hotels, gang wars have killed 900 people this year. Pauline Bax, Antony Sguazzin and Paul Vecchiatto report how the cause lies in the five decades of apartheid social engineering, the legacy of which persists despite 25 years of democracy.Greece’s Mitsotakis Gets ‘Show Me’ Treatment From InvestorsKyriakos Mitsotakis oversaw the firing of thousands of state employees to fulfill creditors’ demands five years ago. As Greece’s new premier, he’ll again need to show investors that his post-bailout government can take more bold measures to overhaul the economy, Sotiris Nikos reports.And finally … Frustrated at a parliament stacked with oligarchs, Ukrainians backed little-known candidates, including a wedding photographer and a fitness director, in Sunday’s elections. Volodymyr Verbyany writes how that dealt a blow to powerful men who’ve held sway in the assembly for decades. To contact the author of this story: Michael Winfrey in Prague at mwinfrey@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Kathleen Hunter at khunter9@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

(Bloomberg) — Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.

Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren is trying to beat Donald Trump at his own game by going big on policy. New U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is also taking a bold approach after storming to power with a pledge to get a better Brexit deal or leave the European Union without one.In Saudi Arabia, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is trying to build a futuristic supercity, while in Hong Kong, inequality is kindling fear that goes beyond the street protests shaking the Asian megalopolis.We hope you enjoy these and other longer stories from the past seven days – including one about Ukraine’s oligarch purge and another on the rising violence in Cape Town – in this edition of Weekend Reads.

Elizabeth Warren Has Radical Plan to Beat Trump at His Own GameShe’s staking her campaign on bold policy promises. Read Joshua Green’s profile of her push for a platform that includes a wealth tax, wiping out student debt and giving Medicare to everyone in a giant leap in Democratic ambition.

Will Ireland Buckle in the Face of Johnson? Don’t Count on ItAs Johnson cements power in London, the mood in Dublin remains resolute. Dara Doyle reports how Ireland isn’t budging after the U.K.’s new leader demanded scrapping of the backstop, the proposed arrangement for keeping the Irish border open after Brexit.

Build It and They Will Come? Saudi Prince’s Megacity Takes ShapeIn the sleepy fishing village of Khurayba, Prince Mohammed wants investors to help him realize a $500 billion vision. Vivian Nereim and Donna Abu-Nasr write about the plans for a futuristic city with state-of-the-art resorts and smart technologies run by robots.

Mexico’s President Keeps Score by the Peso as Economy NosedivesPresident Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador tends to ask advisers for an update on how the peso is doing. Nacha Cattan explains that, while it’s doing pretty well, it’s about the only good news. Also, read Eric Martin’s account of how plans to transform the country have run into a tough reality.

The #NoMarriage Movement Is Adding to Korea’s Economic Woesn accountant during the week, Baeck Ha-na spends her weekends promoting the “live-alone life” as a YouTube star in South Korea. Jihye Lee reports how a growing number of women are rejecting marriage and motherhood, intensifying economic challenges for a country with one of the world’s lowest birth rates.

Hong Kong’s Despair Runs Deeper Than Violent Street ProtestsCandy Kwok worries about about her daughter’s future more than a government crackdown against her and other protesters in Hong Kong’s streets. Shawna Kwan and Natalie Lung tell how crippling inequality is complicating efforts by the city’s government to quell the worst political crisis since 1997.

Rising Cape Town Gang Violence Is Another Legacy of ApartheidJust 12 miles from Cape Town’s beaches and five-star hotels, gang wars have killed 900 people this year. Pauline Bax, Antony Sguazzin and Paul Vecchiatto report how the cause lies in the five decades of apartheid social engineering, the legacy of which persists despite 25 years of democracy.

Greece’s Mitsotakis Gets ‘Show Me’ Treatment From InvestorsKyriakos Mitsotakis oversaw the firing of thousands of state employees to fulfill creditors’ demands five years ago. As Greece’s new premier, he’ll again need to show investors that his post-bailout government can take more bold measures to overhaul the economy, Sotiris Nikos reports.

And finally … Frustrated at a parliament stacked with oligarchs, Ukrainians backed little-known candidates, including a wedding photographer and a fitness director, in Sunday’s elections. Volodymyr Verbyany writes how that dealt a blow to powerful men who’ve held sway in the assembly for decades.

 

To contact the author of this story: Michael Winfrey in Prague at mwinfrey@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Kathleen Hunter at khunter9@bloomberg.net

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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